I attended a Mindfulness at Work event recently. Although it was a sublime experience, one particular concept made me uncomfortable when I first heard it. The mindfulness practitioners used a phrase of ‘not striving’ as though striving is a bad thing.

I don’t know about you, but to me, ‘striving’ has a good connotation. We often hear striving in the phrase, ‘striving to achieve’ … a super positive phrase. I guess it’s a pretty deep seeded belief I have that those who focus and push for what they want earn the rewards they receive.

I always did like good old Jacques Derrida‘s deconstruction, so what the hell, let’s do like George Costanza in Seinfield and test drive the opposite.

Watch this funny video and continue reading to see how thinking the opposite about striving could help you.  

What if ‘striving’ is a negative force in our lives instead of a positive one? This is my take on the concept of striving inspired by listening to smarter spiritual and much more ‘mindful’ people than myself.

The point of not striving is not to stop trying to achieve great things. The point is to achieve great things from a powerful and peaceful place of being. Sometimes when something isn’t working to plan, acceptance or patience with the situation is called for. It may be possible to force a situation through, but there may be consequences in doing so or other opportunities may be missed because of this single-mindedness.

So for example, I am sharing this information about mindfulness and my thoughts now, because I genuinely believe that everyone benefits from learning techniques to bring peace and focus to our crazy work days.  Surely, we can all benefit from being more peaceful, more mindful. You can download some mindfulness exercises on your mobile http://www.skillpill.com/mind/ to learn more. The rest is up to you. Once I’ve expressed my thoughts, it frees me to move onto something else without trying to push for a particular outcome.

Is it still important to push to get things done? You bet. It’s more about being ‘mindful’ of the place of being that you push from.